Prisoner – Darkholme Keep http://darkholmekeep.net/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 05:49:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://darkholmekeep.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-70x70.png Prisoner – Darkholme Keep http://darkholmekeep.net/ 32 32 More cameras not a simple answer for prisoner safety, lawyer says https://darkholmekeep.net/more-cameras-not-a-simple-answer-for-prisoner-safety-lawyer-says/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 05:49:11 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/more-cameras-not-a-simple-answer-for-prisoner-safety-lawyer-says/ MOUNT STERLING — Inadequate camera coverage at the Western Illinois Correctional Facility has been an issue during the trials of guards charged after the death of prisoner Larry Earvin in 2018. Earvin, 65, was handcuffed and beaten by no fewer than 13 guards after he refused to return to his cell, resulting in injuries so […]]]>

MOUNT STERLING — Inadequate camera coverage at the Western Illinois Correctional Facility has been an issue during the trials of guards charged after the death of prisoner Larry Earvin in 2018.

Earvin, 65, was handcuffed and beaten by no fewer than 13 guards after he refused to return to his cell, resulting in injuries so severe prosecutors compared them to those seen in a high-speed car crash. Earvin died on June 26, 2018, six weeks after the beating, according to testimony presented during trials in federal court.

Prosecutors argued that Earvin suffered the injuries that ended his life in the segregation unit vestibule, which lacked surveillance cameras. Earvin was months away from his release from Western Illinois Correctional Facility, where he was serving a six-year sentence for a robbery in Cook County.

“Under the leadership of Director Rob Jeffreys, we have strengthened security measures across the state, including the installation of 79 new cameras at the Western Illinois Correctional Center,” said Naomi Puzzello, manager. of public information for the Illinois Department of Corrections.

However, the head of a prison advocacy group said more cameras were not the simple answer to a complex problem.

“Having more cameras by itself is not the answer. It’s how they are used. They don’t do the work for you. The question is who is monitoring the cameras? Are they doing it in real time? Who is viewing footage? Are the cameras focused where they are supposed to be focused? Jennifer Vollen-Katz, executive director of the John Howard Association in Chicago, said.

The Association, an independent correctional oversight organization, last inspected Mount Sterling Prison in 2019. A 2017 inspection revealed complaints from prisoners about staff misconduct.

“Several inmates reported that correctional officers who assaulted inmates falsely accused the inmate of resisting to justify the use of force,” the 2017 report states. were covered by cameras were areas where such assaults between staff and inmates occurred.”

Puzzello said other steps to keep inmates safe have been taken, including instituting a unit management system at several facilities, including western Illinois, to create a greater contact between advisers, security personnel and detainees.

“This approach increases communication opportunities and improves the department’s responsiveness to the concerns of those in custody,” Puzzello said.

She said a de-escalation response team has been instituted at each facility, made up of specially trained staff who attempt to de-escalate individual situations and gain voluntary compliance from inmates.

Vollen-Katz said many of DOC’s problems can be traced to a larger problem, namely staff turnover and the culture inside the facilities.

“A lot needs to be addressed in Illinois. We are experiencing staffing shortages, which makes it difficult for inmates and staff. This is an area of ​​great concern. I don’t know the specifics of DOC staffing issues. , but they’re down 20% system-wide, and it’s up to 30% in some facilities,” Vollen-Katz said.

“When you have fewer staff it is more difficult to get inmates out of their cells. This ripples through and affects all aspects of prison life. We are concerned for everyone involved,” he said. she declared.

Vollen-Katz said a culture change and staff training is needed because that’s what affects how staff and inmates treat each other.

“The more inmates are engaged in programming and the more they come out of their cells for academic training, vocational training or employment, it helps set the tone and leads to less frustrated people,” Vollen-Katz said.

Puzzello said the DOC was trying to address many issues by creating the role of chief inspector to review the grievance process and identify trends in submitted grievances to help the department identify staff misconduct.

“Overseeing both the grievance process for detainees and constituent services allows the Chief Inspector to identify areas of mutual concern for detainees and family members, to monitor trends and to offer departmental policy suggestions to address these areas of concern,” Puzzello said.

The Chief Inspector visits facilities to speak to inmates and staff to identify areas for improvement not only for the grievance process, but to ensure areas of concern are brought to attention of the administration of the establishment and the director, said Puzzello.

Three state corrections officers have been charged in federal court with attacking Earvin and lying to investigators to cover up the assault. Mendon’s Todd Sheffler was charged in December 2019 along with Mount Sterling’s Willie Hedden and Quincy’s Alex Banta.

Hedden pleaded guilty in March 2021 to charges of civil rights violations and providing misleading information. Banta was found guilty in April of deprivation of civil rights, deceptive conduct, obstructing an investigation and falsifying documents. On August 23, a federal jury found Sheffler guilty of civil rights violations and four other counts.

“What happened to Larry Earvin isn’t going to end unless they address the bigger issues,” Vollen-Katz said. “Doing one thing is not enough. It has to be a holistic approach; better for the prisoner, better for the staff.”

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Prisoner on trial assaults doctor, 31, inside Delhi jail, case closed https://darkholmekeep.net/prisoner-on-trial-assaults-doctor-31-inside-delhi-jail-case-closed/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 01:35:55 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/prisoner-on-trial-assaults-doctor-31-inside-delhi-jail-case-closed/ The accused hid in the bathroom and then allegedly sexually assaulted her. (Representative) New Delhi: A remand prisoner allegedly assaulted a 31-year-old doctor at Mandoli prison in Delhi and also attempted to rape her, police said on Tuesday. The incident happened on Monday when the junior resident doctor was carrying out regular checks on all […]]]>

The accused hid in the bathroom and then allegedly sexually assaulted her. (Representative)

New Delhi:

A remand prisoner allegedly assaulted a 31-year-old doctor at Mandoli prison in Delhi and also attempted to rape her, police said on Tuesday. The incident happened on Monday when the junior resident doctor was carrying out regular checks on all inmates, they said.

The accused hid in the bathroom and then allegedly sexually assaulted her. He even tried to rape her. But the doctor sounded the alarm and alerted the security personnel. She managed to push him away and ran outside, a senior police officer said. The inmate was apprehended immediately,” a prison official said. Police received information about the incident from the deputy warden of the prison, officials said.

The doctor was contacted and advised. His medical examination was also carried out, said a senior police officer.

A case was registered under Sections 376 (rape), 511 (attempt to commit offenses punishable by life imprisonment or imprisonment, and in such attempt to do any act with a view to commission of the offence) 307 (attempted murder), 35 (when such an act is criminal because it was committed with criminal knowledge or intent) and 506 (criminal intimidation), the officer said .

The accused is in prison in two cases of crimes against women. He was convicted in a 2020 case filed at Yamuna Depot Metro Police Station, he added.

Prison authorities said they have tightened security around the barracks to prevent any such incidents in the future.

(Except for the title, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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Brittney Griner: Where are we with the prisoner swap? This New York lawyer has inside information https://darkholmekeep.net/brittney-griner-where-are-we-with-the-prisoner-swap-this-new-york-lawyer-has-inside-information/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 20:30:02 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/brittney-griner-where-are-we-with-the-prisoner-swap-this-new-york-lawyer-has-inside-information/ Criminal Defense Lawyer Steve Zissou and his client, convicted Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout, who serving a 25-year sentence in federal prison, are eager to make big news when/if the prisoner exchange takes place. The White House and the Kremlin seem to agree to hand over Bout in exchange for WNBA Star Brittney Griner who […]]]>

Criminal Defense Lawyer Steve Zissou and his client, convicted Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout, who serving a 25-year sentence in federal prison, are eager to make big news when/if the prisoner exchange takes place.

The White House and the Kremlin seem to agree to hand over Bout in exchange for WNBA Star Brittney Griner who is in his eighth month in a Russian prison for possessing less than a gram of cannabis oil in his suitcase while entering a Moscow airport to complete his seventh season with Russian team UMMC Yekaterinburg.

Read more: Why won’t the Russian billionaires who own Brittney Griner’s basketball team help her get out of jail?

“Listen, it’s no secret, they wanted it [Bout] been back for several years now,” Zissou told CNN several days before Griner was sentenced to nine years in a Russian penal colony on August 4.

New York Magazine interviews Viktor Bout’s lawyer

“As the WNBA entered its offseason this month, Griner’s many fans and supporters awaited answers from Griner’s agent, the league, the White House — anyone in a position of authority — about when she could come home. But if they really want to know what his future holds, maybe they better ask Zissou,” wrote Barshad of Amos.

So what gives? Zissou argues that Bout’s 2008 arrest and 2010 extradition were bogus, that he was specifically targeted for a fabricated crime so he could be charged in the United States. The result led directly to tougher treatment of Americans involved in legal issues in Russia, including Brittney Griner, Zissou argues.

The Queens-based attorney noted that Bout55, could be out as early as 2027, meaning his value in any potential trade is “declining rapidly,” which isn’t good news for Griner.

Zissou had thought of the exchange of prisoners but I figured the State Department would never listen to him. However, they could listen to the families of former Marine Paul Whelan and Brittney Griner’s wife, Cherelle, who he admitted weren’t keen on getting involved with Bout. known as the “Merchant of Death” – a nickname Zissou hates.

The breakthrough took place in July when Secretary of State Anthony Blinken said the United States had made a “substantial offer” to Russia for Griner and Whelan, which Moscow confirmed.

Zissou told Barshad that the United States and Russia are “on the verge of an exchange. And the way you can tell this is about to happen is everyone is quiet. The main factor in a possible fight agreement is the motivation of the White House to release a top athlete like Griner. Zissou doesn’t think a deal will happen until midterm, so the White House doesn’t seem kind to Russia. And when it does, it will happen without advanced fanfare.

When Bout is released, Zissou says, “they’ll just wake him up in the morning.”

What does Bout himself have to say to his lawyer?

“You have to be patient. It will happen.”

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

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All 5 Ostron Prisoner Locations in Kahl’s Junk Run Mission in Warframe | Where to Rescue Ostron Prisoners in Junk Run https://darkholmekeep.net/all-5-ostron-prisoner-locations-in-kahls-junk-run-mission-in-warframe-where-to-rescue-ostron-prisoners-in-junk-run/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 19:26:04 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/all-5-ostron-prisoner-locations-in-kahls-junk-run-mission-in-warframe-where-to-rescue-ostron-prisoners-in-junk-run/ Just like in The New War, Kahl-175’s Junk Run mission tasks Warframe players with the rescue of five Ostron prisoners held by the remnants of the Narmer. There are five fixed spawns for Prisoners of Ostron in the Junk Run mission, and like in The New War, players must track them down even in hidden […]]]>

Just like in The New War, Kahl-175’s Junk Run mission tasks Warframe players with the rescue of five Ostron prisoners held by the remnants of the Narmer. There are five fixed spawns for Prisoners of Ostron in the Junk Run mission, and like in The New War, players must track them down even in hidden corners of the map.

Finding the five prisoners of Ostron rewards players with 15 shares, a currency that the Tenno can redeem for Chipper in Kahl Garrison for Archon Mods, Styanax blueprints, weapons, and customization items. However, finding all five Ostrons isn’t the only opportunity to earn stock, as there are also a series of miscellaneous objectives that award the currency.

Related: All Archon Mods In WarframeExplain

Here are the locations of the five prisoners of Ostron in Warframes Junk Run mission for Kahl-175.

All five Ostron prisoner locations in Junk Run

First Location: In the Deacons Hall

The first Prisoner of Ostron spawns in the room where you can fry the Deacons with the Arc Mines. After clearing the area, head to the objective marker on your map and hug the left side to spot this Prisoner of Ostron (along with two possible locations for Grineer Genestamps). Don’t go through the checkpoint just yet, though: there are two more Ostron prisoners in a nearby area. Enter the passage on your left and prepare to release them.

Second place: In a small room after the Deacons

From the first prisoner of Ostron, turn left and enter the tunnel just past the tree (which may contain a Genestamp). From there, head inside and look for that Prisoner of Ostron right in front of you. He is not the last prisoner of Ostron in the room, however.

Third location: hidden corner in the room with the deacons

From the second Ostron Prisoner, take the door on your left and keep following the room to the end, which should allow you to climb up a ledge. From there, head straight until you can see this Ostron’s cage to free them. Don’t remove the barrier in the Deacons Hall until you save those three Ostrons. It’s right next to the Somachord tone and a dead Grineer.

Screenshot via Digital Extremes

Fourth Location: By Thumper Coins

This prisoner can be found right next to the Thumper Coins, which should appear on your map as soon as you get the Hellion Pack from a fallen Grineer. Follow the icon that appears (or take a right after picking up the jetpack) to spot the room with the Thumper coins and that helpless prisoner right next to it.

Screenshot via Digital Extremes

Fifth location: In a small room with a waterfall before opening the bridge

As you near the end, the game will ask you to open an energy barrier leading to a bridge. When it does, return to the previous room and squeeze right to reveal a hidden room with a waterfall and some sentient enemies. The last Ostron you will need will be found by a staircase on the left side of the room.

After you find all the Ostrons, you can complete the mission and extract to get your 15 actions. If by any chance you missed prisoners of Ostron, you can try again as many times as you want.

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Moving prisoners out of J&K An administrative exercise: DG Prisons https://darkholmekeep.net/moving-prisoners-out-of-jk-an-administrative-exercise-dg-prisons/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 13:00:51 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/moving-prisoners-out-of-jk-an-administrative-exercise-dg-prisons/ Representative photo Srinagar- The transfer of prisoners from Jammu and Kashmir out of the Union Territory is a purely administrative exercise undertaken due to overcrowding in the prisons, the Director General of Prisons of HK Lohia said on Saturday. Lohia was speaking to reporters on the sidelines of a function at Srinagar Central Jail. It […]]]>

Representative photo

Srinagar- The transfer of prisoners from Jammu and Kashmir out of the Union Territory is a purely administrative exercise undertaken due to overcrowding in the prisons, the Director General of Prisons of HK Lohia said on Saturday.

Lohia was speaking to reporters on the sidelines of a function at Srinagar Central Jail.

It is (the movement of prisoners) an administrative matter. If the prisoners in a prison exceed its capacity, some of them must be transferred outside. For this process, all parameters are checked.

But it’s not like we can’t deal with radicalization here and we have to send them outside where it can be dealt with. It is therefore at best an administrative exercise, said DG Prisons.

He was responding to a question about reports that 150 detainees, including terrorists, had been moved to prisons outside JK after being allegedly involved in radicalizing other prisoners.

Lohia said radicalization inside prisons is not a serious issue and the department is addressing it.

Radicalization occurs when their minds are filled with poison. Moreover, if they have suffered something bad, the risks of radicalization are greater. So we have to keep that in mind and we have to keep them engaged in various constructive activities like we have music camps etc here.

An idle mind may have such thoughts, but if there are such elements, then we have their treatment and also advise them. So it’s not a very serious problem, but yes, we’re dealing with that too, he said.

On the issue of imprisoned terrorists being able to communicate with their network outside of prisons to carry out certain activities, DG Prisons said that while such incidents cannot be denied, it is not like a free highway and the department is taking action preventive.

If we say every prisoner talks on the phone like it’s a free highway, then it’s not like that. You encounter a bad network outside (prison) and you have to understand the situation inside the prisons.

“So these are narratives that are being built. Things are under control, but yeah, that can’t be completely denied and whatever action needs to be taken to curb that, we will take it,” he said. he adds.

Lohia said prisons are like hospitals where prisoners are treated to make them better.

Prison is a place of correction. Our effort is that those who come out of prison do not return there. We also give them professional training so that it helps them in their future life. We have taken a number of measures, several initiatives to provide them with better facilities and we will continue to make better arrangements for them, he said.

Previously, DG Prisons donated blood at Srinagar Central Jail and launched blood donation campaign to support the nationwide mega blood donation campaign on Prime Minister’s birthday Narendra Modi.

The department has launched such camps in 13 prisons across the Union Territory.

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Families of death row inmates worry after inmate dies after release — Radio Free Asia https://darkholmekeep.net/families-of-death-row-inmates-worry-after-inmate-dies-after-release-radio-free-asia/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 04:43:58 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/families-of-death-row-inmates-worry-after-inmate-dies-after-release-radio-free-asia/ A former Vietnamese death row inmate has died six years after his name was cleared and he was released. Huynh Van Nen, 60, died of hepatitis and pneumonia at Vung Tau City Hospital on September 13. His death has raised concern among the families of other convicted prisoners as their health is threatened by the […]]]>

A former Vietnamese death row inmate has died six years after his name was cleared and he was released. Huynh Van Nen, 60, died of hepatitis and pneumonia at Vung Tau City Hospital on September 13. His death has raised concern among the families of other convicted prisoners as their health is threatened by the harsh living conditions in Vietnamese prisons.

News of Nen’s death was posted on Facebook by Nguyen Than, former chairman of the people’s committee of Tan Minh commune in Ham Tan district of Binh Thuan province.

He worked alongside Nen’s father for 20 years to seek justice.

Huynh Van Nen is known as the “prisoner of the century” because he was convicted in two consecutive murder cases: the death of a neighbor Nguyen Thi Bong in Binh Thuan province and the murder of Duong Thi My, in 1993 for which Nen and nine of his relatives were convicted. He was imprisoned in 2008 and was only released in 2016 after serving more than 17 years.

The Binh Thuan Judicial Agency publicly admitted wrongdoing and apologized to Nen and his family. He received 12 billion VND ($500,000) in compensation for the time he was unjustly imprisoned.

News of Nen’s death after only a few years of freedom has made Nguyen Truong Chinh’s family extremely worried.

Chinh is the father of death row inmate Nguyen Van Chuong, who claimed his innocence after being found guilty of being the main culprit in the 2007 murder of a police major in Hai Phong.

“Through the example of Mr. Huynh Van Nen, we see how harsh Vietnamese communist prisons are,” he told RFA. “It’s so serious that as long as my son is in prison, we are still extremely worried. Death row inmates awaiting execution like my son have a leg chained day and night, so their physical and mental health suffers a lot. .

On the morning of September 14, 2022, Chinh and his wife went to government agencies, the National Assembly and the Party Central Committee to complain about the injustice suffered by their son, but were detained by the police who took them away and released them later. .

In the case for which Chuong was convicted, Major Nguyen Van Sinh of the Dong Hai Ward Police Station in the Hai An District of Hai Phong City was killed while on patrol. Chuong and four other people have been charged with her murder. He was sentenced to death while the other four were sentenced between 12 months and life imprisonment.

The death row inmate and his family have filed numerous petitions, asking all levels of the administration to reconsider the sentence. Chuong alleges that he was beaten and coerced by the investigator when the testimonies of the other suspects contradicted each other. The mark of the weapon described and the marks on the victim’s body were inconsistent in their statements.

Lawyer Le Van Hoa served as the head of the Central Home Affairs Committee’s Unjust Punishment Inspectorate from 2013 to 2014 and was responsible for reviewing many unjust cases, including the case of Nguyen Van Chuong.

Mr. Hoa said that after studying Chuong’s case, his team realized that the death sentence against Nguyen Van Chuong was full of holes.

“There is no sufficient basis to accuse Nguyen Van Chuong of being the mastermind as well as the perpetrator of the death of Police Major Nguyen Van Sinh,” he said. “Our judgment was rendered based on the testimony of the defendant and the results of the examination of the scene.

“For this reason, in order to ensure that the right person [is sentenced] for the crime to be just and the truth to be objective, we had proposed that the central commission of internal affairs consult the permanent commission of the National Assembly to orient and re-examine this affair.

For unknown reasons, the Central Committee for Internal Affairs has stopped considering the case and the death penalty remains in force, he added.

Nen was one of many people who were wrongfully convicted in serious cases such as murder, robbery and rape. Those exonerated include Han Duc Long and Nguyen Thanh Chan.

In addition to death row inmate Nguyen Van Chuong, who pleaded not guilty, there were others like Ho Duy Hai and Le Van Manh who also claimed that they did not kill people even though they had been sentenced.

Ho Duy Hai was convicted by three courts, including the Supreme People’s Court Council of Judges, as the man who killed two female postal workers, Nguyen Thi Anh Hong and Nguyen Thi Thu Van, at Cau Voi Post Office in Nhi Thanh commune, Thu Thua district, Long An province, on the evening of January 13, 2008.

Hai, born in 1985, was sentenced to death for murder.

The investigation violated the law in numerous instances, including destroying evidence, altering exhibits, omitting forensic evidence such as fingerprints and bloodstains at the scene, removing case of evidence in favor of the accused and ignoring the assertions of the accused that he was not guilty.

During the session of the Court of Cassation in May 2020, the Judicial Council of the Supreme People’s Court rejected the Attorney General’s request for the cancellation of the conviction in the first instance and the appeal judgments for a new investigation and l cancellation of Hai’s death sentence.

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Mountain West prisons struggle to hire and retain staff https://darkholmekeep.net/mountain-west-prisons-struggle-to-hire-and-retain-staff/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 19:47:00 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/mountain-west-prisons-struggle-to-hire-and-retain-staff/ Brief news More than 200 positions at the Wyoming Department of Corrections are currently unfilled — about 20% of all staff — as worker shortages pinch prisons around Mountain West, including in New Mexico, Utah, Coloradoand in tribal prisons. Paul Martin, administrator of the Wyoming Department of Corrections, said it’s hard for prisons to compete […]]]>

Brief news

More than 200 positions at the Wyoming Department of Corrections are currently unfilled — about 20% of all staff — as worker shortages pinch prisons around Mountain West, including in New Mexico, Utah, Coloradoand in tribal prisons.

Paul Martin, administrator of the Wyoming Department of Corrections, said it’s hard for prisons to compete with other higher-paying jobs, including those in county jails. A online advertising lists the starting salary for a corrections officer in Wyoming at around $18 per hour, while a similar job in Nebraska pays at least $22 per hour, according to the Casper Star Tribune.

“We see fast food chains competing with us on starting salaries,” Martin said. “The work goes where the money flows. So to be competitive, you know, it just takes money.

Martin said understaffing has been a constant problem at the department for decades, but has worsened lately as the nationwide labor shortage persists. It provides for possible entry-level salary increases to try to hire and retain people.

“There are just fewer people in the workforce today than in the past,” he said. “It’s a problem for us, [but] it has not yet reached the level of public security.

Current employees are working extra overtime to fill the void.

Beyond macro trends, Martin noted that jobs in correctional facilities are tough and, as is the case in Wyoming, they are often located in isolated rural areas.

“Everything you can think of that is wrong in society exists in prisons with greater density than outside,” Martin said.

Martin sees prison positions as genuine public service opportunities that will always be in demand. However, he said there are so many other places to work right now.

This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Wyoming Public Media, Nevada Public Radio, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, KUNR in Nevada, the O’Connor Center for the Rocky Mountain West in Montana , KUNC in Colorado, KUNM in New Mexico, with support from affiliate stations throughout the region. Funding for the Mountain West News Bureau is provided in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

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Disease threatens lives of 600 Palestinian prisoners https://darkholmekeep.net/disease-threatens-lives-of-600-palestinian-prisoners/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 19:23:51 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/disease-threatens-lives-of-600-palestinian-prisoners/ The head of the research and data department of the Palestinian Commission for Detainees Affairs claims that 600 Palestinian prisoners suffer from illnesses. Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli occupation prisons Some 600 Palestinian prisoners are suffering from illnesses in Israeli occupation prisons, Abdel Nasser Farwana, head of the studies and documentation department of the Commission […]]]>

The head of the research and data department of the Palestinian Commission for Detainees Affairs claims that 600 Palestinian prisoners suffer from illnesses.

  • Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli occupation prisons

Some 600 Palestinian prisoners are suffering from illnesses in Israeli occupation prisons, Abdel Nasser Farwana, head of the studies and documentation department of the Commission for Detainees and Ex-Detainees Affairs, said on Saturday.

Farwana pointed out that the prisoners go through tragic circumstances, brutal treatment, atrocious tortures and the criminality committed by the Israeli occupation against Palestinians imprisoned in Israeli prisons.

“Many of these prisoners suffer from serious illnesses such as cancer, and they suffer from critical health conditions in light of the occupation authorities’ deliberate medical negligence,” Farwana said.

Prisoner Nasser Abu Hmeid “is dying in prison, and some prisoners suffer from physical, psychological and sensory disabilities”, he said, warning that all Palestinian prisoners were held in inhumane conditions without receiving medical care. appropriate medical procedures and subject to medical negligence.

“This problem exacerbates their suffering and worsens their health condition, and it could lead to martyrdom for some of them, as it has already happened for others,” Farwana noted.

The official called on all agencies and organizations involved in prisoners’ rights and human rights to “defend the prisoners of Palestine in agreement with each other and develop a common vision to internationalize the medical issue, as well as ‘to launch a serious international campaign to save the lives of sick prisoners and protect other prisoners from the danger of catching diseases in Israeli prisons.

Prisoner Abu Hmeid with cancer, occupation refuses to release him

Abu Hmeid’s brother said Al Mayadeen two days ago his brother was subjected to a slow death from medical negligence. “The latest medical report calls for my brother’s release, but the Israeli occupation has yet to respond.”

The Palestinian Prisoners Club said on Thursday that Nasser Abu Hmeid, a critically ill Palestinian prisoner with cancer serving a life sentence in Israeli occupation prisons, is currently battling death due to the worsening of his state of health.

Meanwhile, the Wa’ed Prisoners Association warned that Abu Hmied had reached a dangerous stage, noting that the cancer had spread to the prisoner’s body about a year and a half ago.

The Association pointed out that the Israeli occupation had committed a crime of systematic medical negligence against Abu Hmeid with the aim of killing him slowly.

He pointed out that the Israeli “Asaf Harofeh” hospital had waived its medical responsibility for the prisoner with cancer and recommended his release, while this decision came after Abu Hmeid had entered the phase of clinical death.

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The case of the introduction of anklets to decongest prisons https://darkholmekeep.net/the-case-of-the-introduction-of-anklets-to-decongest-prisons/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 21:01:16 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/the-case-of-the-introduction-of-anklets-to-decongest-prisons/ Columnists The case of the introduction of anklets to decongest prisons Tuesday 06 September 2022 Inmates at Naivasha Maximum Security Prison. PICTURES | MACHARIA MWANGI | NMG A few days ago, the Institute of Economic Affairs published an interesting research article by Leo Kemboi and Jackline Kagume which talks about the constitutional argument, public financial […]]]>

Columnists

The case of the introduction of anklets to decongest prisons


Inmates at Naivasha Maximum Security Prison. PICTURES | MACHARIA MWANGI | NMG

A few days ago, the Institute of Economic Affairs published an interesting research article by Leo Kemboi and Jackline Kagume which talks about the constitutional argument, public financial management and social justice for the introduction of electronic monitoring of prisoners using ankle bracelets to decongest our facilities.

This is an article that should be of interest to people in the criminal justice field, particularly the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.

For starters, KNBS data shows that there are more unsentenced prisoners each year than sentenced prisoners. Data from the Department of Prisons also shows that the number of people incarcerated nationwide is almost double the capacity of these facilities.

For any economist, you easily point to an existing negative externality here, basically the manager not bearing the cost of actions. Similar negative externalities are common in many criminal jurisdictions, the most pronounced being in the United States and Israel.

Back in Kenya, the negative externality stems from the fact that the responsibilities of pre-trial detention, prison congestion as well as the release of bail from the defendants lie neither with the police nor with the prosecutors.

The burden of pretrial detention and prison congestion is borne by the state through the Department of Prisons, while the burden of raising bail falls on individuals, providing little incentive for prosecutors to use prisons wisely.

Data shows that there have been an increasing number of defendants in jail for minor offenses and most are failing to raise funds to facilitate bail and cash bail.

For female prisoners, approximately 60% are in prison for alcohol-related offences. The informal sector of the alcohol market has the highest participation of women and is subject to severe criminal penalties.

Furthermore, the majority of crimes reported in Kenya are those for which the penal code prescribes sentences ranging from less than one year to three years, commonly referred to as misdemeanors or misdemeanors.

So clearly there is a problem in our criminal justice system. Now, there are a number of proposals for how these negative externalities in the criminal justice system can be addressed.

The first would be to cap prison capacity. This means limiting the number of inmates in a facility to help reduce the incentive to use prisons wisely.

The second would be to introduce electronic monitoring through ankle bracelets, as the research paper proposes. Thus, the research is based on data from 2016 to 2021 simulating that if 25% of unconvicted prisoners wore anklets, the overall prison population would decrease by an average of 16%.

If half of all unconvicted prisoners wore the anklets, the total number of prisons would decrease by almost 29%. If at least 75% of unsentenced inmates wore ankle bracelets, the total prison population would decrease by 47%.

The United States was the first country to require a parole offender to wear an ankle bracelet to monitor their behavior in 1983 in an effort to cut costs and increase the efficiency of corrections.

Other countries have taken it up such as the UK where prison overcrowding was seen as a problem (the average prison population was 49,000, which is 7,000 more than certified normal accommodation and 2,000 more than the previous year) that could only be solved by electronic monitoring.

So far, many countries have embraced electronic monitoring and its time, Kenya is opening up its criminal justice space for such experiments.

Research establishes that the state spends an average of 270 shillings a day just to feed each of the 55,000 prisoners and such prison reforms would save Kenya more than $5.5 billion used annually to feed prisoners. And therein lies the compromise to induce the state to consider the proposal.

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17-year-old Ukrainian describes his experience as a prisoner of war https://darkholmekeep.net/17-year-old-ukrainian-describes-his-experience-as-a-prisoner-of-war/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 21:12:35 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/17-year-old-ukrainian-describes-his-experience-as-a-prisoner-of-war/ Vlad Buryak, 17, was traveling by car on the morning of April 8 and stopped at a Russian checkpoint. Within hours, he would find himself in a Russian prison. Russian soldiers had seen his cellphone and accused him of filming it, he told ABC News’ Britt Clennett in a Zoom interview. They took his phone […]]]>

Vlad Buryak, 17, was traveling by car on the morning of April 8 and stopped at a Russian checkpoint. Within hours, he would find himself in a Russian prison.

Russian soldiers had seen his cellphone and accused him of filming it, he told ABC News’ Britt Clennett in a Zoom interview. They took his phone and checking his photos and social media, they found a pro-Ukrainian Telegram group.

The soldiers were furious, he said, and threatened to kill him on the spot. Instead, he was taken to a filtration camp and then to a prison where he spent 48 days before finally being released.

Thousands of Ukrainians were reportedly held as prisoners of war and hundreds of thousands were forcibly expelled from the country through so-called filter camps.

The children’s experience during the war, which spanned more than six months, was particularly traumatic and offers a chilling portrait of the painful reality on the ground in Ukraine.

The UN estimates that nearly 1,000 children have been killed or injured during the conflict and more than 5 million Ukrainian children, both inside the country and living as refugees, are in need of humanitarian assistance. .

Firefighters work to put out a fire in Sloviansk, Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, August 29, 2022.

Leo Correa/AP

The prison he was placed in is ‘so horrible and so difficult’, he said, adding that hearing constant cries of ‘help me’ and ‘don’t beat me’ breaks you inside .

His job was to wash floors, clean rooms that had been used for torture “three or four days a week”, he said.

He helped pass information between prisoners, written on small pieces of paper which they tried to smuggle outside the prison walls to their family members.

He was not beaten, but saw others being beaten and tortured. Although he noticed everything going on around him, he tried to be invisible, he said, concentrating on his work. He didn’t want the Russian soldiers to know what he was seeing.

PICTURED: A soldier with the call sign Bury walks through one of the villages near the Kherson frontline in the Mykolaiv region, Ukraine, August 8, 2022.

A soldier with the call sign Bury walks through one of the villages near the Kherson front line in Mykolaiv region, Ukraine, August 8, 2022.

The Washington Post via Getty Images

During the interview with ABC News, he admitted that he probably blocked many aspects of his time in prison. “If you see horrible things, your brain forgets it.” If he dwells too much on the past, “I can have problems in my head,” he says, “and I don’t want to have [that].”

So, he says, “I’d rather not think about it.”

It was very difficult to maintain his psychological health in prison, he said. If you show emotion, there is fear of being beaten and tortured, and never being released, he said.

“If you start crying, if you start getting mad at these Russian soldiers, these Russian soldiers can kill you or torture you.”

To stay sane, he talked to himself. “I think about what I do when I have freedom. What I do after prison, what I do with my family, how I visit my friends, how I go to coffee, how I go to McDonalds “, did he declare.

After 48 days, he finally found his father.

“You can’t explain this emotion,” he said, displaying a maturity beyond his years. “That emotion you can only feel.”

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