Emedieval House – Darkholme Keep http://darkholmekeep.net/ Mon, 16 May 2022 02:25:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://darkholmekeep.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-70x70.png Emedieval House – Darkholme Keep http://darkholmekeep.net/ 32 32 The Cornish house of artist John Miller for sale https://darkholmekeep.net/the-cornish-house-of-artist-john-miller-for-sale/ Sun, 15 May 2022 23:15:00 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/the-cornish-house-of-artist-john-miller-for-sale/ Published: 12:15 16 May 2022 The former home of artist John Miller and the landscape in which it sits are both creative and steeped in history. It is also currently on sale. It’s easy to see why the artists loved this house, situated on the beach at the head of the Hayle Estuary, it’s overlooked […]]]>

Published:
12:15 16 May 2022



The former home of artist John Miller and the landscape in which it sits are both creative and steeped in history. It is also currently on sale.

It’s easy to see why the artists loved this house, situated on the beach at the head of the Hayle Estuary, it’s overlooked by big skies, huge bodies of water and open sandy beaches.


The Hayle Estuary with Ferryman’s Rest, which is for sale with Lillicrap Chilcott
– Credit: Lillicrap Chilcott

Views like this, spanning the estuary and St Ives Bay, with its golden sands and azure seas, are now an iconic image of Cornwall. And that’s largely thanks to the artist John Miller, who lived in this house.

John was already an established painter by the time he moved to Ferryman’s Rest in the 1990s and would take early morning walks along Porthkidney beach just below the house, inspired to paint by light and landscape which opened before him.

His idyllic Cornish beach scenes, with their glowing beaches and deep blue skies, have been exhibited everywhere and have a global audience; they are synonymous with the county and have influenced contemporary Cornish art.

Ferryman’s Rest is now for sale, and its creative legacy has endured for quite some time, according to current owner Nicola Cannon Brookes.


The Dining Room at Ferryman's Rest on the Hayle Estuary in Lelant

The Dining Room at Ferryman’s Rest on the Hayle Estuary in Lelant
– Credit: Lillicrap Chilcott

Nicola and her husband bought the house in 2006 from artist couple Janet Lynch and Ian Brown. She says at the time she remembers the signs of creativity, the paint, the palettes and the smell of oil paint, but she had no idea of ​​the connection to the late John Miller at Penzance in 2002.

This happened thanks to bits of information gleaned from the ‘walking community’ who passed the house on their way to the beach.


An interior view of Ferryman's Rest, the former home of John Miller, Lelant Cornwall

An interior view of Ferryman’s Rest, the former home of John Miller
– Credit: Lillicrap Chilcott

The New Craftsman Gallery in St Ives was very helpful, she says, and she eventually made contact with John’s partner, potter Michael Truscott, who lived with him at Ferryman’s. “I never got to speak to John Miller, but Michael was such a lovely man.”

Inspired by this heritage, Nicola invited artist Alan Kingwell to spend time at the house as “artist in residence”. His paintings hang on the walls today, a reminder of the painters who once lived and were inspired by the house.


Relax outside and enjoy the views of the Hayle Estuary from Ferryman's Rest, Lelant, Cornwall

Relax outside and take in views of the Hayle Estuary from Ferryman’s Rest
– Credit: Lillicrap Chilcott

The house, located under the old St Uny church and with the beach below, was the scene of many happy family memories, says Nicola. Just looking at the water is enough to spend several hours, she says.

‘We never get bored. There are always fishing boats going out, rowers training and in recent years we have had the stand up paddle boards. It is also a very large area for kitesurfers. On a windy day, you’ll get 20-30.


Sunset over the Hayle Estuary from Ferryman's Rest, Lelant

Sunset over the Hayle Estuary
– Credit: Lillicrap Chilcott

It turns out that Ferryman’s has even more famous connections. Writer Ruth Aspinall was a former landlord, and Lelant-born writer Rosamunde Pilcher was married at St Uny’s Church and apparently loved the walk from there to the beach past the house.

The house and the area have a special atmosphere, says Nicola, who is passionate about protecting the beloved Rosamunde trail.

The path is now part of the St Michael’s Way, part of the medieval pilgrimage route taken by pilgrims from Ireland and Wales, heading to St. James’s Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela in Spain. It cuts 12 miles through land from St Uny’s Church to Mount St Michael.

“There is such a huge history here and at the church, which is 1000 years old, and one of the earliest Christian sites in the country.

“It’s steeped in a huge amount of history – it gives you chills!” she says.

Nicola and her husband both lived in and rented the house for the holidays. They live on a nearby property and have enjoyed hosting people at Ferryman and seeing the effect being in a home in such a location has had on them.

Nicola hopes that a new owner will also fall in love with her story. And if another artist or creative moved in, well… that would be perfect!

Ferryman’s Rest is a four-bedroom detached house, along with John Miller’s former art studio, the Beach House, now a separate two-bedroom residence.

There are steps to the beach, a large sun deck, lawned seating area and a boathouse with perpetual planning.

It’s on the market for £1,500,000 at Lillicrap Chilcott, Truro.

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What happened to Weird Science’s Ilan Mitchell-Smith? https://darkholmekeep.net/what-happened-to-weird-sciences-ilan-mitchell-smith/ Fri, 13 May 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/what-happened-to-weird-sciences-ilan-mitchell-smith/ Although he never graduated from high school (although he is “proud to be one of the alumni of [the fictional John Hughesian] Shermer High School”), Mitchell-Smith came to a point in his life, he told ABC in 2017, to “look at what the future looks like with me as an actor, or what the future […]]]>

Although he never graduated from high school (although he is “proud to be one of the alumni of [the fictional John Hughesian] Shermer High School”), Mitchell-Smith came to a point in his life, he told ABC in 2017, to “look at what the future looks like with me as an actor, or what the future if I pursue this very cheesy thing I’m into, and always have been into, which is history and medieval stories. And I was lucky to have that choice, but when I looked it was clear what I wanted to do… I think I’m just super nerdy – the armor is really shiny – and it do I study all the time now.”

He tossed the scripts aside and hit the books, got his GED, got his BA and MA in Medieval Studies with a major in History, and topped it all off with a PhD in English Literature. He is currently an Associate Professor of Medieval Literature and Culture at California State University Long Beach. Mitchell-Smith is “proud to be at CSULB” and has described his work as “mostly teaching pre-renaissance English stories”, from the 8th century to the 16th century, covering works such as “Beowulf” and Chaucer. He likes to talk about “the roles that men fill and the roles that women fill and how they are portrayed as being either sanctioned or unsanctioned, encouraged or unencouraged”.

He is also co-director of the University’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and patron of the Medieval and Renaissance Students’ Association. He’s been instrumental in setting up thematic panels and lectures on campus, such as “Confronting White Supremacy and Decolonizing the Middle Ages,” as well as ones that really interest him – like monsters.

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Turin: your ultimate travel guide to the host city of Eurovision 2022 https://darkholmekeep.net/turin-your-ultimate-travel-guide-to-the-host-city-of-eurovision-2022/ Wed, 11 May 2022 10:15:45 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/turin-your-ultimate-travel-guide-to-the-host-city-of-eurovision-2022/ After Victory for Italy last yearthe Eurovision Song Content 2022 is taking place in Turin this month. The first semi-final took place on Tuesday May 10, the second semi-final is on Thursday May 12 and the all-important grand final is on Saturday May 14. All screenings take place at 9:00 p.m. CEST. If you were […]]]>

After Victory for Italy last yearthe Eurovision Song Content 2022 is taking place in Turin this month.

The first semi-final took place on Tuesday May 10, the second semi-final is on Thursday May 12 and the all-important grand final is on Saturday May 14.

All screenings take place at 9:00 p.m. CEST.

If you were lucky enough to get tickets or just want head into town to soak up atmosphere, here are some suggestions for activities to do in and around Turin.

What does Turin look like?

Surrounded by the Alps, it has a slight French feel to the city and historically housed the Italian royal residence. Turin is famous for its cars (it is home to Decree), coffee (Lavazza) and Nutella which is produced nearby.

Due to its geography, Turin can get very hot, even in spring. The surrounding mountains act as a shield against the wind, and this means that in the summer the city can feel like it’s in a big flying pot. So be sure to bring light, comfortable clothes and stop by the ‘Toret’, the free public fountains dotted around the city.

The water comes straight from the Alps and the fountains are shaped like a bull’s head – the animal from which Turin takes its name.

What to do in Torino?

Visit the Mole Antonelliana

This monument is almost the logo of Turin, and you can see it punctuating the horizon from afar. There are a panoramic elevator which takes you to a terrace, or if you’re feeling brave you can also climb the stairs to the top.

Stroll through the Parco del Valentino

It is a large park in the center of town, home to the university’s beautiful architecture department.

There is also a medieval mini-town (“Borgo”) hidden in the park. It’s a great place to bring a picnic and relax, or go biking or skating.

Enjoy the view from Monte dei Cappuccini

After a slightly steep climb, it’s worth the hike to what is probably the best view in town. You can really see how Turin is surrounded by Alps that stretch for miles and it’s a great photo opportunity.

Behind the belvedere is a late Renaissance style church, built for the Capuchin Order – which is also worth seeing.

Go for a bike ride by the river

There is a nice cycle path along the Po river. If you start at the Chiesa della Gran Madre di Dio church and continue east towards Isolone di Bertolla, you will eventually arrive at Parco del Meisin where there is a small secluded beach.

There is a lot of bike rental shops across townas well as the bike-sharing service application ‘ToBike’, which offers daily or weekend passes.

Discover the many museums

In the unlikely event that the weather is not on your side, good alternatives inside are: the Cinema Museum (located in the Mole), the Car Museum (ideal for Fiat fanatics), the Lavazza coffee and the Egyptian museum.

The Egyptian Museum is actually considered the largest collection of Egyptian artifacts in the world outside from Egypt.

Where to eat in Turin?

You should try the local specialty of Gianduiotti, a hazelnut chocolate specific to the region, and of course the Nutella which is also made near Turin.

Farinata is a type of pizza made with chickpea flour, which you will rarely find outside of Turin.

Other local specialties include Vitello tonnato and Fritto Misto.

Osteria Cianci

It’s a cozy traditional place for lunch or dinner, and they almost exclusively serve local dishes.

It sits in a square – Largo IV Marzo – which is full of other great dining options too, and it’s a fantastic place to have an ‘aperitivo’ before dinner.

flower burger

Burgers like you’ve never seen them before. This vegan spot offers burgers that look more like pop art: in neon pinks and Instagrammable purples.

Circolo dei Lettori

This is still relatively unknown and hidden by beautiful marble steps. Rooms that once belonged to the royal family now serve as paneled academic reading spaces and a tea room.

With a peaceful library atmosphere, it’s a perfect place to enjoy tea and cakes accompanied by chandeliers and priceless artwork.

Alberto Marchetti

This is a great place for ice cream – worth trying the Gianduiotto flavor if you can.

Where to have a drink in Turin

Piedmont – the region that includes and surrounds Turin – is a famous wine regionso be sure to try some local varieties such as Barolo or Barbaresco while you’re there.

After your dinner, you may be offered a local digestive from the region, often made from alpine plants, such as genepì or San Simone.

If you don’t drink, Molecola is a local variant of Coca-Cola (its name refers to Turin’s famous mole monument).

Bicerin is another favorite; it’s made of Espressodrinking chocolate and milk, usually served with whipped cream on top – although this one is perhaps better suited to winter.

In Piazzale Valdo, Open Baladin is a great place to sample Turin craft beers and chill with the locals. It looks more like a mini festival than a pub.

Try the San Salvario neighborhood if you want a slightly more edgy nightlife experience, and Club Centralino is a great LGBTQ+ spot.

How to get to Turin by train

Since Romeyou can get to Turin by train with Trenitalia or Italo in about 5 hours.

There are also direct train lines from other major Italian cities such as Bologna, Florence and Milan.

From France, there are direct buses from Lyon, and a high-speed rail link under construction – although it is unclear when this will be completed.

There are also high-speed TGV services from Paris which will take you to Turin in around 5 hours.

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Moments of peace in the midst of hectic lives are possible. We just need to know where to look | Moya Lothian-McLean https://darkholmekeep.net/moments-of-peace-in-the-midst-of-hectic-lives-are-possible-we-just-need-to-know-where-to-look-moya-lothian-mclean/ Mon, 09 May 2022 10:03:01 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/moments-of-peace-in-the-midst-of-hectic-lives-are-possible-we-just-need-to-know-where-to-look-moya-lothian-mclean/ I spend a considerable part of my time seeking moments of peace. This is partly a result of the world we live in: we’re locked into a 24/7 society, where overstimulation is the norm. But it also evokes personal contradictions: I have an endless to-do list that propels me every day, each action a check-off […]]]>

I spend a considerable part of my time seeking moments of peace. This is partly a result of the world we live in: we’re locked into a 24/7 society, where overstimulation is the norm. But it also evokes personal contradictions: I have an endless to-do list that propels me every day, each action a check-off task, from lunch to the walk to the store. For someone who wants peace so much, I don’t leave him much room.

Clearly, I am not alone in this quest. Much has been made of the relentless cultural march of ‘mindfulness’, a concept originating in a meditative practice but now apparently used to refer to everything from paying nearly £70 a year for an app to wild swimming . Too many columns have already been devoted to dissecting the prevalence of mindfulness, but suffice it to say that I see its rise to mainstream status (and its subsequent commodification) as a symptom of a massive search for a small pocket of peace.

Last year I worked on a podcast episode for the Wellcome Collection to accompany an exhibition they were presenting which was partly about the concept of tranquility. In conversation with collaborator, environmental psychologist Dr Eleanor Ratcliffe, I scrolled down a list of places in my adopted home, London, where I had felt a sense of transcending my dirty little self. to be awash in complete peace: the tippy-top of St. Paul’s Cathedral; the Watts Memorial in Postman’s Park; a medieval church tucked away on Ely Place, one of the city’s last private roads. There was a common thread there, Ratcliffe told me, citing the work of his doctoral student Ruairi Patterson: awe, that transcendent sense of awe and wonder that might be triggered by a particularly fiery sunset, or watching your friend stuff four hot dogs into her mouth immediately.

I was intrigued by this and contacted Patterson. Yes, he told me, there is growing evidence that wonder can reduce stress and improve well-being.

Patterson pointed me to a paper published last year, led by a Peking University researcher, who found that experiencing “awesome phenomena” could lead to greater life satisfaction and less stress. Previous work has also suggested that wonder is a key component of nature’s ability to reduce stress levels and improve well-being. “These effects,” says Patterson, “result at least in part from the ability of awe-inspiring experiences to ‘put things into perspective’ by making oneself and one’s personal concerns seem small compared to the perceived vastness awesome phenomena.”

A nice idea, isn’t it? Yes, I thought, fear certainly plays a central role when I feel most serene. But thinking about it, I’m sure that’s not the only factor; there are many times when I have felt fear and yet I have not quite reached that state of peace. After reflection, I proposed an alternative thesis: it is about being out of context.

The times I feel the most peaceful are when I’ve stepped out of the normal flow of my daily life and into someone else’s timeline. Like entering a church as a non-believer, with no religious tradition in my past. Cycling in a park that I never usually visit. Lunch at a museum café instead of reheating my salmon and vegetables at home. When I am out of context, my problems are unable to find me until I have slipped into the rhythms of my normal existence. The more I thought about it, the more correct it seems to me. I remember the great sense of peace that came over me as a child when I walked out of school in the middle of the day for a doctor’s appointment. Sitting on the hard plastic chairs in the waiting room, I heard the cries of my classmates in the courtyard of the neighboring school and I felt completely calm not being there with them, in my place. It’s a comforting mix of near-anonymity, newness, and escaping the wreckage that accumulates by simply existing.

By its very nature, finding stillness by stepping out of yourself is not a way to be sustainable. It is a state that can be torn away; at some point, I have to put myself back in place. I suspect that being constantly at peace would breed complacency. Having to fight for something, even if it’s inner calm, unfortunately means that I appreciate it more. At least armed with the exact knowledge of the conditions that create this feeling of serenity, he feels within reach. That alone is soothing. And I did it without the help of a mindfulness app. Saving £70 on Self-Knowledge: Now That’s Peace.

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Massachusetts period home from the 1680s asks for $1.2 million https://darkholmekeep.net/massachusetts-period-home-from-the-1680s-asks-for-1-2-million/ Wed, 04 May 2022 21:31:00 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/massachusetts-period-home-from-the-1680s-asks-for-1-2-million/ This house doubles as a habitable museum. Daniel Lummus’ historic home in Ipswich, Mass. came on the market. The rare early period property – defined as a half-timbered house built by 17th-century settlers using Old World building techniques – offers a great opportunity for antique enthusiasts to own a bit of history for an asking […]]]>

This house doubles as a habitable museum.

Daniel Lummus’ historic home in Ipswich, Mass. came on the market. The rare early period property – defined as a half-timbered house built by 17th-century settlers using Old World building techniques – offers a great opportunity for antique enthusiasts to own a bit of history for an asking price of $1.25 million.

Built circa 1686, nearly a century before American independence, the heritage 41 High St. has been “lovingly restored/preserved by the current owners”, who have added modern conveniences while carefully maintaining its original details. Originally, according to the listing, owned by Churchill Properties. Andrea Lacroix.

“We bought it because we were afraid the house would end up being demolished or badly damaged,” the current owners told Forbes of their reasoning for buying the then-abandoned and decaying four-bedroom in 2008. “It was abandoned. The house had no wiring or plumbing and was leaning forward because the summer beam had been removed. It was horrible.

The house is one of 60 known First Period houses in the town of Ipswich, which is located 30 miles northeast of Boston and has the densest collection of settler structures in the United States.

The house is one of only 60 known First Period houses in the area.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
A walk-in kitchen fireplace is among the property’s many historic charms.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
There are four bedrooms in total.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The house has been lovingly restored by the current owners.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The house sits on a 0.38 acre lot.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The current owners have updated windows, roof and mechanics.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
A double sink in one of the three bathrooms of the house.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
There is a paved driveway in front of the house.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The property is said to have been built around 1686.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The kitchen has been updated with a 15 foot island.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The structural style of the house was popular in medieval times.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The landscaped outdoor spaces include a patio and several gardens.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The original “summer beams” of the house are from a bygone era.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
There are four fireplaces in total.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The house is located in a famous town rich in historic homes outside of Boston.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The house is two stories.
Photograph by Corinne
ipswich mass first period home
The dining room bathed in natural light.
Photograph by Corinne

With the help of local conservative architect Matt Cummings, they succeeded not only in restoring the enormous two-storey horizontal “summer beams” (a key structural feature of its early period medieval building style), but also added contemporary amenities, including an updated roof, windows and mechanical systems, Forbes reported.

Home buyers will now get a move-in ready address that features 11 rooms of a cozy yet historic living space with four fireplaces, three bathrooms, vaulted ceilings, a kitchen with dining area and a master suite with a walk-in closet. -in closet and an adjoining bathroom spread over its 3,130 square feet. There is also a utility room on the first floor, a barn converted into a library, a garage converted into a home office and a kitchen fireplace. Outside there is a patio, gardens and a paved driveway.

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What is the Golden Age, this year’s Met Gala theme? – NBC Los Angeles https://darkholmekeep.net/what-is-the-golden-age-this-years-met-gala-theme-nbc-los-angeles/ Mon, 02 May 2022 21:35:37 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/what-is-the-golden-age-this-years-met-gala-theme-nbc-los-angeles/ The Met Gala is back and this year’s theme centers around the Golden Age. Fashion’s biggest soiree takes place on Monday night and is set to raise funds for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute in its typical, glitzy, star-studded fashion. The Met Gala is best known for its eye-catching themes, which determine the […]]]>

The Met Gala is back and this year’s theme centers around the Golden Age.

Fashion’s biggest soiree takes place on Monday night and is set to raise funds for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute in its typical, glitzy, star-studded fashion.

The Met Gala is best known for its eye-catching themes, which determine the dress code for attending guests. Previous Met Gala themes include “camp,” a celebration of cheesy, over-the-top looks, and “heavenly bodies,” a look at medieval art and fashionable religious motifs.

This year, the theme is actually a continuation of that of the last Met Gala, which was held in September 2021.

But unlike last year’s “In America: A Lexicon in Fashion,” which focused on modern fashion in the United States, this year’s “In America: An Anthology of Fashion” looks at historical fashion in the American wing of the Met.

The dress code itself is “gold glamour, white tie”. Combined with the museum’s exhibit featuring “men’s and women’s clothing from the 18th century to the present day”, it seems like the Met Gala is taking inspiration from America’s Golden Age.

But when and what is the golden age about?

When was the golden age?

The Golden Age is a term for a period of time in the late 1800s, generally considered to be from the 1870s to the early 1900s. It is the period of United States history immediately after the end of the Civil War and just before the start of the First World War.

Where does the name “Gilded Age” come from?

American author Mark Twain coined the name “Gilded Age” alongside Charles Dudley Warner, in their 1873 book The Golden Age: A History of Todayaccording to the American Museum of Natural History.

The epoch name is one that underlines the difference between a truly robust society and one covering its faults with the appearance of fortune.

Photo AP/Steven Senne

FILE – In this November 19, 2010 file photo, a woman walks past the main entrance to the Marble House mansion, in Newport, RI Newport’s Golden Age mansions typically attract 800,000 visitors a year for marvel at their seaside opulence and fantasize about life as one of the fabulously rich. But a 28% drop in business since March 1, 2011 has prompted the group that runs the mansions to offer a petrol discount to appeal to those genuinely concerned about soaring fuel prices. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, file)

Gilding, the practice of covering another material with gold leaf, does not make that item as valuable as something made of real, solid gold.

The term “was a tongue-in-cheek commentary on the difference between a true golden age and their current era, a period of booming prosperity in the United States that created a class of super-rich,” the AMNH says on its website.

What happened during the Golden Age?

The United States was recovering from the social and economic chaos caused by the Civil War and was going through a period of heavy industrialization as railroads and factories spread rapidly across the country and the world.

In Southern California, the oil industry and the relatively new Southern Pacific Railroad played an important role during this period. It’s also when a lot of people moved to Los Angeles.

The industrial boom brought unprecedented wealth to the chosen few – the entrepreneurs who made their fortunes during this period. If you recognize the names of John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, or Cornelius Vanderbilt, their legacies were built during the Golden Age.

Visitors walk towards an entrance to The Breakers mansion in Newport, RI

Photo AP/Steven Senne

FILE – In this December 1, 2014 file photo, visitors walk through an entrance to The Breakers mansion in Newport, RI Visitors to the spectacular Gilded Age mansion are now allowed to explore its depths with a new tour that shows the servant technology that helped make the 70-room building state-of-the-art when it was completed in 1895. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

The expanding upper class and middle class spent their newfound money on elaborate homes, clothing, and other material goods, made more widely available and affordable through mass production in factories.

As the Met puts it, “At this time, art infused everything—furniture, lighting, ceramics, metalwork, jewelry, even clothing—and manifested itself in artistic interiors.” Everyone who could wanted to show off their money and good taste.

This world of wealth is the setting for many shows set in America in the late 1800s, including HBO Max’s critically acclaimed new show “The Gilded Age.”

Former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown (right) watches as curator Kevin Jones with the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising unveils a rare vintage coat

AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown (right) watches as curator Kevin Jones with the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising unveils a rare vintage coat at the annual Great Earthquake and Fire of 1906 anniversary luncheon. of the event, a call was made to find and preserve historic clothing from San Francisco’s Golden Age.

But while a small number of people and businesses accumulated more wealth, often due to unregulated and exploitative business practices, large swaths of the population lived in rental housing, especially the many recent immigrants. in the USA.

The result has been a lot of economic anxiety about income inequality, according to Mary Furner, a history professor at UC Santa Barbara.

“What was happening in the late 19th century,” Furner explained in a 2016 article on 19th century versus modern United States, “is that people up and down the population hierarchy , from the poor to the rich, all saw the serious problems of trying to run a country based largely on unregulated competition, laissez-faire.”

All of these changes and anxieties led to social commentary in the form of new artistic styles, fashions and literature. For example, Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel “The Age of Innocence” is one of the best-known books that examines the Golden Age.

It was made into a 1993 film, starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Wynona Rider and Michelle Pfieffer by director Martin Scorsese. Scorsese is also one of many directors tapped to help with the Metropolitan Museum’s “In America: An Anthology of Fashion” exhibit.

What kind of fashion will we see at the 2022 Met Gala?

Part of the fun of the Met Gala is the surprise when guests show up in their costumes, but there are some hallmarks of Gilded Age fashion that could show up Monday night.

Feathers, corsets and structured dresses are all period-themed, according to experts cited by the TODAY show.

And, just like previous costumes worn by celebrities at the Met Gala, the theme welcomes over-the-top ensembles.

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5 amazing day trips from Florence https://darkholmekeep.net/5-amazing-day-trips-from-florence/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 13:33:48 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/5-amazing-day-trips-from-florence/ Do not mistake yourself; I love being in Florence. As a volunteer archivist in one of Florence’s libraries, I am used to spending long weekends in this captivating city. Just walking around and soaking up the beauty of its architecture, art, and even shop windows has always given me great pleasure. But…deep down, I’m a […]]]>

Do not mistake yourself; I love being in Florence. As a volunteer archivist in one of Florence’s libraries, I am used to spending long weekends in this captivating city. Just walking around and soaking up the beauty of its architecture, art, and even shop windows has always given me great pleasure.

But…deep down, I’m a country girl equally willing to escape the crowds, traffic and noise of the city, even if it means leaving the birthplace of the Renaissance and the home of Dante. Here are five of my favorite day trips from Florence, all of which promise to give you more of Tuscan beauty.

karamysh / Shutterstock.com

1. Fiesole – A short bus ride up the hill

It’s easy to get away from this city, because you can take the number 7 bus from Santa Maria Novella station. Be sure to buy a bus ticket at the station or any kiosk, and don’t forget to stamp the ticket after boarding. If you get caught, it’s a whopping €50 ($52.75) fine that you have to pay on the spot. I have seen a number of tourists suffer this indignity! Taxis will also take you there.

The good part about taking the bus is that you get off at the last stop, so no frantic worries about when to jump off. About halfway you start climbing out of town and can catch a few snippets of views of the surrounding countryside. It’s the same climb ironically described in Forester’s famous novel A room with a view.

You arrive in Piazza Mino da Fiesole and are immediately struck by the expansive beauty of Florence below you. There are a number of well-signposted scenic walks with places where you can see the cathedral and baptistery, shimmering like tiny jewels in the Arno valley.

Having ancient Etruscan origins (8and–4and century BC. J.-C.), Fiesole is rich in important archaeological remains. Also, while enjoying its hiking trails, you can easily spend the day visiting the archaeological area and museum, the city’s cathedral, the Roman theater and the Bandini art museum. Don’t forget to enjoy a meal, a drink and the view at one of its many restaurants and cafes.

    San Giovanni Fuorcivitas in Pistoia.
San Giovanni Fuorcivitas, in Pistoia (Photo credit: Caroline Schouten-van Parreren)

2. Pistoia – Take a train to a medieval marvel

Pistoia is one of those towns that most people speed past on their way to Lucca, but its medieval center is one of the best preserved in Italy and well worth a visit. About 30 minutes by train from Florence, it’s an easy day trip.

The Cathedral of San Zeno is unmistakable with its elegantly banded Pisan Romanesque facade adorned with Italian sculptor Andrea della Robbia’s lunette of the Virgin and Child between two angels. Directly opposite is the 4and century Baptistery of San Giovanni, designed in an octagonal shape.

Visit the Baptistery first and buy your tickets for the Chapel of San Jacopo and the bell tower, both located inside the cathedral. You won’t want to miss the chapel. Upon entering the cathedral, turn right to find the grated chapel with its unique treasure: a dazzling silver altarpiece called the Altare d’Argento di San Giacomo (Silver altarpiece of Saint-Jacques). The goldsmiths started the altarpiece in 1287 and the sculptor Filippo Brunelleschi finished it 2 centuries later. Led by a guide, climb the bell tower for a bird’s eye view of the iconic square.

Pistoia has many museums, but the one I visited is dedicated to the city’s most famous son, sculptor and modern painter, Marino Marini (1901-1980). His gallery is inside the Palazzo del Tau. I found dozens of his drawings and paintings there, mostly female nudes and horses that were a refreshing break from Renaissance art.

The daily market of Pistoia.
The daily market in Pistoia (Photo credit: Catherine Ann Lombard)

Pistoia has a lovely daily food market at Piazzetta dell’Ortaggio well guarded by the Pozzo del Leoncino (The Well of the Little Lion). Here you can also see Sole Tower (Spinning Sun) – contemporary Pistoia artist Roberto Barni’s striking life-size sculpture of three blindfolded men carrying oil lamps.

This square was once the entrance to the Jewish quarter, which consisted of a narrow arch closed by an iron gate, still visible today. As you walk through the former ghetto, you can see that the windows are smaller than in neighboring buildings, a typical feature of ghetto architecture.

Pistoia is packed with restaurants, specializes in alfresco dining, and is ready to serve you an aperitif while soaking up the atmosphere loved by locals and tourists alike.

Piazza dell’Anfiteatro, Lucca (Photo credit: Catherine Ann Lombard)

3. Lucca – An Afternoon with Puccini

Lucca, the former capital of a Lombard duchy and for more than 500 years an independent and powerful republic (1160-1805), is one of the highlights of Tuscan history and culture. From Florence to Lucca, train and car take about 1.5 hours.

One of Lucca’s standout features is the 3-mile walk along its city walls, which encircle the city center. As you walk in the shade of the trees, you can enjoy a magnificent view of the main buildings of the city. Most notable is the 13andGuinigi tower from the last century with trees growing on its roof. The roof garden originally belonged to the kitchen, located below.

Lucca has 130 towers in all, including the bell towers of the Romanesque Basilica of San Frediano and St. Martin’s Cathedral, the tower of San Michele in Foro which marks the ancient Roman Forum, and proximity Torre dell’Orologio (Clock tower).

Since most of the city center is traffic-free, Lucca is a great place to stroll, shop on its famous Via Fillungo, and visit medieval churches. Discover small and large squares with fountains and cozy cafes, and enter beautiful buildings like the Palazzo Pfanner with its remarkable architecture and enchanted garden. Don’t miss one of Lucca’s jewels, Piazza dell’Anfiteatro, whose buildings stand on the ruins of the 2n/a-century Roman amphitheater. It is one of Lucca’s popular meeting places, full of taverns and restaurants.

Lucca is the birthplace of famous musicians. Don’t miss the statue of Luigi Boccherini (1743-1805) just in front of the city’s music academy or the Puccini Museum, former home of Giacomo Puccini (1858-1924). Lovers of his music are entitled to daily performances in the old baptistery.

    The forest around Vallombrosa.
The forest around Vallombrosa (Photo credit: Catherine Ann Lombard)

4. Vallombrosa – Go by car for a day in nature

If Fiesole, Pistoia and Lucca still seem too urban to you, hop in a rental car, pack some lunch and head east towards the Casentino Valley at the foot of the central Apennine mountains. It’s a part of Tuscany where you simply can’t go wrong, full of shrines, churches, castles and beautiful forests.

One of the closest and most interesting places to visit is Vallombrosa Monastery and National Reserve. From Florence, take the SS 67 along the Arno river passing through Pontassieve and follow the signs that indicate the way to follow. It’s about 45 minutes from Florence.

Vallombrosa, which means “Valley of Shadow”, is best known for its old monastery and will satisfy nature lovers and art lovers alike. The abbey itself contains many works of art and sits on the edge of a primeval forest. Here you are at the medieval cradle of Italian forestry and you should note the Paradisino or “Little Paradise”. The Paradisino is the old forestry school located on a rock just above the monastery from where you have a magnificent view of the buildings and their surroundings.

During your visit, also note the large basin in front of the Abbey. It’s not for swimming (even in the hot and humid summer), but rather for raising fish for the monks’ slow fasts.

But what I really love about Vallombrosa are the hiking trails through over 3,000 acres of quiet woods that are always cool and shady during the summer months. Many Florentines escape the summer heat here and there are several hotels and restaurants nearby. It is a protected natural area and spectacular in autumn when the trees change color.

Vallombrosa Monastery (Photo credit: Catherine Ann Lombard)

5. Camaldoli – Another road to a spiritual world

From Vallombrosa, drive another 45 minutes to the unique spiritual setting of Camaldoli. As you begin, pause at the top of the mountain above Vallombrosa for spectacular views across the Casentino Valley. If you look far to the east you will see the curious mountainous landmark of La Verna.

Descending down the mountainside, at the bottom of the valley, you will reach the picturesque Poppi (which is also worth a visit), from where you will climb again to the double-monastery village of Camaldoli.

Saint Romuald of Ravenna arrived here in 1012 with some disciples and they built a group of hermitages, each with its own bedroom, meditation hall and vegetable garden. Inside the enclosure, he also built a small chapel where the monks met for community prayers. Here you can visit Romuald’s hermitage, the church and a shop with many different monastic products. Nine hermits currently live here.

From the sacro eremo, walk about 50 minutes on a path, through another beautiful forest, and you will arrive at the monastery. Originally a guest house of the hermitage, it was quickly transformed into a monastery where more than 40 monks currently live. This combination of communal and solitary life is a characteristic of the Camaldolesi.

The cloister inside the Holy Hermitage and Camaldoli Monastery.
The cloister inside the Holy Hermitage and Camaldoli Monastery (Photo credit: Catherine Ann Lombard)

The buildings include two cloisters (in the largest there is a library), the refectory, the guest rooms and the monks’ cells. The church, modernized in 1700, retains five paintings by the Italian painter Giorgio Vasari.

Ancient pharmacy in Camaldoli.
Ancient pharmacy in Camaldoli (Photo credit: Catherine Ann Lombard)

Of particular interest is the old monastery pharmacy. Built in 1543, it is furnished with beautiful walnut cupboards and old objects used by the monks for the preparation of medicines. Pharmacies were once a fundamental part of many monasteries, where spiritual and physical healing were dispersed. Today you can indulge in the monks’ honey elixirs, homemade grappa and sweets.

At the end of the day, when you return to Florence, you will not only have all the fond memories of an enchanting outing, but also hopefully renewed energy to return and conquer the sights, wonders and (sip!) shopping.

Be sure to check out these beautiful destinations in Italy:

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Accused in Quebec City sword attack says he began to regret his ‘mission’ after second murder https://darkholmekeep.net/accused-in-quebec-city-sword-attack-says-he-began-to-regret-his-mission-after-second-murder/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:07:30 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/accused-in-quebec-city-sword-attack-says-he-began-to-regret-his-mission-after-second-murder/ Breadcrumb Links PMN News PMN Canada Author of the article: Publication date : April 27, 2022 • 27 minutes ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation Content of the article QUEBEC CITY — The man accused of murdering two people with a sword in Quebec City on Halloween night 2020 testified Wednesday that […]]]>

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QUEBEC CITY — The man accused of murdering two people with a sword in Quebec City on Halloween night 2020 testified Wednesday that after the second murder he began to have doubts about what he called his “mission” .

Carl Girouard, 26, is charged with two counts of first-degree murder in the October 31, 2020 deaths of François Duchesne, 56, and Suzanne Clermont, 61, and he is also charged with five counts of attempted murder. murder.

He admits to having killed Duchesne and Clermont and to having injured five others, but his lawyer will argue that he was not criminally responsible at the time of the facts since he suffered from a mental disorder.

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Girouard testified that his goal was to create chaos, change the world, and encourage like-minded people – whom he called his “alter egos” – to pursue his goal. He said that when he was 18, he believed he had a “top secret” mission to kill and that his life would be sacrificed at the end of it.

After Clermont’s murder, however, he said he began to question his actions.

“I thought I would have a sense of accomplishment, but I didn’t,” Girouard told the jury. “I have decided that there should not be a single death, mine or someone else’s.”

Girouard said his original plan was to attack people inside the Chateau Frontenac hotel in the historic district of the provincial capital. Finding the door locked, he left for a while before returning and attacking people in the streets near the hotel. He was armed with a Japanese-style sword called a katana with a 76.9 centimeter blade and wore black clothes and a short-sleeved kimono.

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Girouard told the court he was scared when he arrived in Quebec and did not want to go ahead with his plan, but felt he had no choice. He described the killings as a duty.

“I went against my will, I didn’t want to, but I had to,” Girouard said. “I saw many people and attacked them with my sword to carry out my mission.”

Chained and handcuffed in the witness box, he told the court that the attack had to take place on Halloween because there would be a full moon. He said he chose Old Quebec because its historic buildings and statues reminded him of the medieval video games he loved.

Girouard said part of his plan was to kill his family and burn down their house before driving to Quebec, which is why police found gas canisters in his car. He didn’t follow the ritual. “I thought to myself that it was not necessary,” he said.

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Earlier, he told the court that he became obsessed with video games as a teenager – especially those involving swords and knives – and started mixing reality and video games. He said he remembers thinking “we should live like in video games”.

Responding to questions from his lawyer, Pierre Gagnon, Girouard described himself as two different people – one who went to work and lived in the real world and the other who was mission-oriented.

Gagnon asked which Girouard was talking to the jury.

“There is a Carl Girouard who is with you today, who loves to make people laugh and help others,” Girouard said. “It’s different from Carl Girouard of the mission, who feels obliged to isolate himself. But that’s in the past. There is no more Carl Girouard from the mission.

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Obsession with his plan caused him to quit his job frequently when he felt his co-workers were trying to get to know him. He said he avoids close relationships in order to stay focused on his goal. After the COVID-19 pandemic, he quit his job and played video games.

Girouard’s mother, Monique Dalphond, told the court earlier that her son had a long history of problems. She said he had been cited for inappropriate behavior from elementary school, adding that a child psychologist had intervened and that Girouard had been medicated for some time.

She told the court her son got a credit card when he was 18 and spent his money collecting katana swords and samurai outfits – his only interests, she said, aside from video games. Girouard, she added, had “no real friends, girlfriends or social life”.

Dalphond told the court she first heard about her son’s plan when police knocked on her door after the attacks.

The Crown, which has argued that Girouard made known his plan to kill people with a sword as early as 2014, will continue its cross-examination on Thursday.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on April 27, 2022.

— By Sidhartha Banerjee in Montreal.

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Green light for 1,400-unit Broadway Malyan program | News https://darkholmekeep.net/green-light-for-1400-unit-broadway-malyan-program-news/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 06:03:36 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/green-light-for-1400-unit-broadway-malyan-program-news/ Show in full screen Broadway Malyan has been given the go-ahead for a massive 1,400-home project on riverside land in Leeds. Leeds City Council councilors voted in favor of the planning officer’s recommendation to approve the project at the end of last week. Designed for Latimer, the development arm of the UK’s largest housing association, […]]]>

Broadway Malyan has been given the go-ahead for a massive 1,400-home project on riverside land in Leeds.

Leeds City Council councilors voted in favor of the planning officer’s recommendation to approve the project at the end of last week.

Designed for Latimer, the development arm of the UK’s largest housing association, Clarion, it will see the construction of 11 blocks ranging in height from eight to 17 storeys.

The largely vacant 5ha site just west of the town center on the banks of the River Aire was previously occupied by the former Yorkshire Chemical Works and a bus depot.

A handful of heritage buildings on the site, including the former Imperial Table House dating from 1913 (pictured below), will be demolished to make way for the new development.

Imperial Image House

The planning application had initially committed just 7% of homes to be affordable, but Clarion has extended that number to 503 homes in total following a successful funding offer from Homes England.

The scheme also includes a 355-bedroom student accommodation block, a riverside park, a new river crossing, 1,100 bicycle parking spaces and commercial and retail space.

Councilor Caroline Gruen, chair of the north and east plans committee, said the development was “a good project and a great use of brownfields”. [land]adding that it was “the management [the council] should come in”.

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Broadway Malyan’s architectural director, Luke Walter, said: “We were keen to maximize the strengths of the site in our masterplan – the River Aire, proximity to the city centre, excellent transport links – and to capture the history of the site as an important aspect of the design process to maintain its authenticity and bring real change to the region.

Last week the firm resubmitted its plans for a massive and controversial housing project in the medieval center of Norwich for developer Weston Homes.

Initial plans for 1,250 homes were rejected by former housing secretary Robert Jenrick in 2020 due to ‘oversize’.

The new scaled-down proposals have removed a 20-storey tower, cut 150 houses and reduced the total floor area by a third.

But Save Britain’s Heritage expressed ‘major concerns’ about the project, which it said was still too big for the historic conservation area site.

Clarion said in January it had completed 1,586 homes in the first nine months of the 2021/22 financial year and increased revenue and profit following a slowdown in the wake of the pandemic.

The 125,000-unit housing association reported turnover of £783m for the first nine months of the financial year, down from £677m.

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Three romantic properties inspired by medieval castles and farmhouses https://darkholmekeep.net/three-romantic-properties-inspired-by-medieval-castles-and-farmhouses/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:20:00 +0000 https://darkholmekeep.net/three-romantic-properties-inspired-by-medieval-castles-and-farmhouses/ Knox Hall, Low Laithe – £835,000 with Beadnall Copley, 01423 503500. For some, the perfect romantic property is a quiet country house tucked away down a lane, for others it’s an attic apartment in the heart of the city. Some like it clear and timeless, others bohemian and buzzy. There seems to be a strong […]]]>
Knox Hall, Low Laithe – £835,000 with Beadnall Copley, 01423 503500.

For some, the perfect romantic property is a quiet country house tucked away down a lane, for others it’s an attic apartment in the heart of the city. Some like it clear and timeless, others bohemian and buzzy.

There seems to be a strong contingent, however, who think their home is their castle and like their property to look the part. The following properties are all reminiscent of castles; what they all have in common are two “wings” connected by a recess – what might historically have been called a “curtain wall”.

None of these mansions have moats, drawbridges or dungeons – nor are they that old – but their designs are all more or less reminiscent of the Middle Ages.

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Rosedale Manor, Kirk Hammerton Lane, Green Hammerton – £1.35m with Savills, 01904 617800.

Arguably the most romantic of the three properties is Knox Hall, a Grade II listed early Victorian building which the agent compares to a “fairytale princess castle”. Perched on elevated ground near Low Laithe, above the main road serving Nidderdale, the detached house makes a rather impressive imitation of a French chateau, but according to its official listing it was probably built for the owner or manager of Knox Mill, a rope and twine mill on the northern edge of Harrogate.

Now restored and extended, it retains many of its original features, such as beams, stone floors and leaded lancet windows. It has five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a laundry room, an office, a kitchen, two reception rooms and a lovely veranda, and all the last four of these rooms enjoy stunning views over the valley. Outside there are gardens with terraces and a pond, as well as a detached double garage and off-street parking. An extra £35,000 will even buy you four acres of ‘Enchanted Woods’ behind the house.

Westfield in Green Hammerton seems to be inspired by the same sources. Pleasantly symmetrical, its facade features an entrance door flanked by angular “twin turrets” on one level. Inside, beyond the reception hall, there are four bedrooms (including one on the ground floor, in one of these turrets), a living room, a kitchen and a fantastic 25-foot veranda. long. The house also has a detached detached garage and 0.83 acres of gardens to the rear, where there is also a large brick outbuilding which could be converted, subject to the necessary consent.

To finish, Rosedale Mansion is a large house whose half-timbered design owes more to “old-fashioned” farmhouses than to medieval castles, but nevertheless exudes a strong odor of romance. Its front door is also recessed between the wings and opens into a large and wide entrance hall supported by strong vertical beams. At the head of this are the spacious kitchen / dining room (with central island), the laundry room, the office, the library and two large reception rooms, one in each “wing”. Upstairs there are five bedrooms and three bathrooms, all opening onto a large landing. The house stands on an exceptionally large plot and has 0.6 acres of gardens, with patio, gravelled driveway and triple garage.

Westfield, Bernard Lane, Green Hammerton – £750,000 with Dacre, Son & Hartley, 01423 864126.
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